7 Secrets that Cost Your Client a Bundle on their Workers' Comp

The possibilities of telemedicine in Workers’ Comp



7 months, 7 days ago

While more and more insurers are offering telehealth as part of their health plans, the highly regulated workers’ comp industry is just getting it’s feet wet. Telemedicine is the use of electronic communication technologies to provide medical services to injured workers without an in-person visit. This fast-paced, instant ability to connect with a medical professional can help a claim to start out right and stay on track. It can be utilized for a range of physician-led services, including initial injury treatment, specialty consultations and follow-up care.

There are several advantages:

  • Immediate attention to minor injuries
  • Fewer emergency room visits
  • More physician and specialist availability
  • Ideal for rural and remote areas
  • Removes transportation obstacles
  • Fewer missed appointments
  • “Stay-at-work” visits improve early return-to-work
  • Aid in management of chronic conditions
  • Initial assessment and evaluation for injuries when access to immediate medical care is limited, such as overnight shifts and remote travel
  • Lower costs

Yet, there are a number of barriers:

  • Employee uneasiness with receiving remote care from an unfamiliar provider
  • Physical examination limited
  • Jurisdictional and regulatory issues
  • Lack of physician fee schedules for telemedicine
  • Start-up technology costs
  • Cybersecurity threats
  • Lack of regulations and policies for licensing and privacy
  • Misdiagnosis

Telemedicine is designed to supplement, not replace, in-person care. For some injured workers, it may be a viable option. As this continues to take hold in workers’ comp, strategies to address the barriers are developing. The types of telemedicine services covered, provider requirements, and reimbursements vary across states and continue to evolve.